I Have Made Some Videos

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Yes, after all these years, I stepped in front of a camera (well, you can see my face in the beginning … the rest of the videos are mostly headless 🙂 ). A few months back, I decided I should probably make some of the recipes in Dr. Atkins “Diet Revolution” book. Now, I have made a few (all of the ones with blue cheese, trying to force myself to like it. It didn’t work) but not enough of the basic recipes to be comfortable enough to really talk about.

So, I looked through them, figured out where I wanted to start (the smallest section lol), ordered some soya powder (because he uses that a lot), set my phone (only camera I have) and tripod precariously on an end table I brought into the kitchen and started making the few recipes in the bread section.

I now have 5 videos filmed (and 4 edited … one more to go) but I wanted to let you know I just uploaded 2 of them! The first one is a basic introduction to the series and the second video is for Diet Revolution Rolls (yes, my first time making Dr. Atkins’ version). Aside from feeling awkward, nervous, and overly-critical, I think it went great! 🙂 I am planning on uploading a new video every week.

I hope you enjoy them!

First is Diet Revolution Rolls, followed by Diet Revolution Bread. I will add links to the recipes as I post them/publish the videos.

https://atkinsjourney.com/2015/03/12/diet-revolution-rolls/

http://atkinsjourney.com/2018/11/02/dr-atkins-cheese-crackers/

Dr. Atkins Interview

While researching, I stumbled onto an interview that Larry King did with Dr. Atkins in 2003 (just before he passed). I spliced, edited, synched the audio and uploaded it to my channel. I may have missed a commercial break or two but I hope you enjoy it as much as I did (though I REALLY do not like Larry King). This was just before he published “Atkins for Life: The Next Level”. If you listen to him, what he says really hadn’t changed since he published his first book in 1972 (except in 2003 there were many more options for low carb eaters).

 

Dr. Atkins’ Cheese Crackers

These were easy to make (really easy) and tasted good! I wouldn’t cut them into 20 pieces, like the recipe says, unless you want crackers the size of Cheez-Its. The crispy edges had a great flavor, so I think if we partially cooked these (until they were set enough to cut), then spread them out on a parchment-lined baking sheet to finish cooking, they would be even better!

Yields 200 crackers

Dr. Atkins’ Cheese Crackers

A simple low-carb egg and sesame "cracker".

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Recipe Image

Ingredients

  • 4 Tablespoons Parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds, crushed in a blender
  • 1 Tablespoon heavy cream
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F.
  2. Beat all ingredients until well blended.
  3. Line a 10×10 in baking pan with parchment paper (you might be able to just do this on a baking sheet … I haven’t tried that yet). Pour in the batter and spread as thin and evenly as possible.
  4. Bake for 30 minutes or until light brown. Cool and slice into 20 1-inch squares (I would cut them bigger). OR you could try my suggestion up there and cook for about 20 minutes, cut, then spread them out on a baking sheet to finish baking.

Notes

Nutrition as written (20 crackers): Per Serving: 32 Cal (80% from Fat, 12% from Protein, 8% from Carb); 1 g Protein; 3 g Tot Fat; 1 g Carb; 0 g Fiber; 0 g Sugar

Nutrition, with egg whites and half and half (20 crackers): Per Serving: 28 Cal (77% from Fat, 14% from Protein, 9% from Carb); 1 g Protein; 2 g Tot Fat; 1 g Carb; 0 g Fiber; 0 g Sugar

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https://atkinsjourney.com/2018/11/02/dr-atkins-cheese-crackers/

My Gallbladder Journey

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When my gallbladder was removed in October of 2017, I thought it would solve so many of my digestive issues. I have gotten better but it took me much longer than the surgeon or all of my doctors thought it should. This has been a very trying (and expensive) 10 months but I have finally turned the corner and wanted to share my discovery with you.

Before my surgery, I would describe my eating as almost intermittent fasting. If I ate anything during the day, it was a small amount and low carb/keto (a bit of meat or cheese … something like that). My biggest meal was dinner with my husband and, to get in all my calories, it was a pretty big meal.

After my gallbladder was removed and I was healed, the surgeon said, “Go back to eating like you normally do.” So, I did and that was a HUGE mistake. I did my best to slowly ease back into my typical eating pattern but once I did, it was awful! It would vary between instant nausea as soon as food touched my stomach to feeling like I had a giant boulder in my gut. My stomach was distended and painful, lasting for up to 6 hours at a time.

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When I was little I was told that a horse’s intestines could get knotted up when they rolled around on the ground (I still don’t know if that’s true … never bothered to look it up). This is what went through my head after I had my gallbladder removed: I thought there was something terribly wrong and my intestines would just explode if I kept eating anything solid. I finally went back to the doctor and that is when the expensive part of this “adventure” began.

First, my gastroenterologist told me to eat low-fat, no solid meats, and low fiber (I have a friend who describes this as the “white bread diet”).  So, that’s what I did, eating ground, low fat meats, eggs, cottage cheese, rice, potatoes (without skins), etc. It did ease some of my symptoms but it caused others (like a 20 pound weight gain).

Next, I had an ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, upper endoscopy, colonoscopy and so much blood work that the lab technician knows me by name. So, what did they find? I have a minor hiatal hernia, GERD, and had 2 polyps removed. Were any of these the cause of my specific gut issues? Nope! None of the doctors knew (or know) what has caused any of my symptoms but I think I have figured it out (thanks to Google).

I tried digestive enzymes. I tried ox bile. I tried apple cider vinegar (this and the ox bile gave me instant heartburn). Then, while frantically Googling, I finally discovered what was causing my issues: I was eating too much food at one time. See, The gallbladder stores bile. When we eat fats/protein, the gallbladder releases enough bile to aid in digestion. Without a gallbladder, bile is slowly released constantly by the liver. So, if you eat a lot of fats or protein at one time, it takes more time to digest.

So, I started eating smaller meals throughout the day instead of one giant meal. Then, I slowly started cutting back on my carbohydrates and adding fats. This has made a huge difference and has enabled me to finally lower my carbohydrates back down to below 20 grams total for the first time in over a year! I read that, over time, my body may adjust on its own (by maintaining a higher level of bile in my digestive tract). This seems to be the case because last week I was able to eat a large T-bone steak without any discomfort at all! Overall, though, I am happy with eating 6 or so small meals per day.

I may never be able to ever do intermittent fasting again but I am thrilled to be able to eat my glorious fatty meats again!

Next week, I will share about my next major health hurdle: atrial fibrillation.

Low Carb Food Storage

Well, since my switch in eating, I’ve been thinking about all of my food storage.  Boy, I have some adjustments to make!  Flour, sugar, jams and jellies (sugar-made), beans, white rice, oats, etc.  So, I went searching for suggestions online.  I found some great links to check out:

I don’t usually like “about.com” articles, this is a good basic one:

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/whattoeat/a/lowcarbemergencyfood.htm

A One-Month Long-Term Food Supply from a Low-Carb Perspective from Claiming Liberty:

http://claimingliberty.com/2011/08/25/a-one-month-long-term-food-supply-from-a-low-carb-perspective/

Here is a video about dehydrating spaghetti squash:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKwopbMrvAg

Paleo Prepper: I have barely looked through this website but it’s intriguing!

http://paleoprepper.com/

Here’s a post by The Low Carb Prepper (good stuff):

http://modernsurvivalonline.com/guest-post-the-low-carb-prepper/

Duh, I didn’t even think of dairy!  “Do you store foods you shouldn’t?”

https://dfwpreppers.com/2011/02/do-you-store-foods-you-shouldnt/

Here’s a thread at The Survival Podcast Forums:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=20965.0

And here’s a post from a now defunct website (the woman was following the HCG diet):

Disaster Preparedness, Low Carb Food Options, No Refrigeration Required

Maintaining During Phase 4

 

A hurricane said to rival Katrina is set to hit the Louisiana coast any minute. In areas decimated by storms, people stand in line for hours, waiting on water and food handouts. They are being turned away, empty handed, when supplies run out.

Natural disasters can happen anywhere at any time. I live in a suburb of one of the largest cities in the Midwest and due to three different ice storms in the last six years, we’ve lost power four to seven days each time. I also live in tornado alley – our area was hit by F5 twisters twice in the last two years and people were without electrical power, phone service and water for weeks at a time.

It can happen to you. Are you prepared? Earthquake, flood, tornado, hurricane or national emergency due to a terrorist activity: any one of these events can happen at any time and cut off basic services for days or weeks. Prepare your emergency food plan and have everything in place before the emergency happens. Your low-carb life style does not have to be put on hold or go out the window if you are faced with sudden adversity.

Water is the most important staple and should be number one on your food list. Allow 2 quarts of drinking water per day for a normal, active person. Be aware that if you are operating in a hot environment that need will double. Children, nursing mothers, people on special diets or the ill will need more water. Allow extra water for food preparation, brushing teeth, hygiene, etc. One gallon of water per day per person should be the absolute minimum you have on hand, and store at least three days worth.

Water can be stored in any food safe container. Empty plastic soda bottles are an excellent choice – wash well and fill. If you have a freezer and don’t keep it completely full of food, store some of your water bottles there. In the event of a power failure the frozen bottles can be used to cool food stored in coolers, and as they slowly melt the ice-cold water will be refreshing to drink. Store your water supply in a cool, dark place, such as the corner of a basement or a basement cupboard.

If you are involved in an emergency situation and your drinking water supplies are running low, keep in mind that the water heater in the home is a storage tank you can tap. Water in the toilet tank, as long as no cleaning agents have been added, can also be used. Do you have a waterbed? Drain it and use that water to flush the toilet, or boil well and use for cleaning. If you have advance warning of an impending disaster, fill the bathtub, the sinks and clean trash cans. This water can be used for the toilets and for cleaning and will preserve your drinking water supply.

A low-carb diet is based on fresh vegetables and fresh protein sources, but in an emergency fresh is not going to be available. If you plan your food storage choices wisely, you can still eat low-carb as you weather the storm.

The obvious protein sources to choose for storage are canned meats and fish – tuna, sardines, salmon, oysters, shrimp, chicken, ham, Spam, turkey, clams, corned beef, chicken spread, ham spread, mackerel and mussels. Read labels and buy the lowest carb count beef or turkey jerky you can find. Meat sticks will also store well.

Stock up on canned beans. Many beans are fairly high in carbs, often containing 12 to 14 grams per half-cup but if you are active in clearing brush or storm debris or are in the maintenance phase of a low-carb diet you can eat more carbs than normal. Think of the other members of your family, too. Men and children, especially if they are active, can eat more carbs and canned beans are an excellent protein source.

Invest in nut butters. Read the labels and pick sugar-free or the lowest carb count you can. Peanut butter and almond butter are good choices. Store sugar-free jam or jelly to go with the nut butters. Even if this is not a food choice you normally eat your children will love you for thinking of them.

Buy canned nuts: pecans, macadamia, Brazil nuts, almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, soybean nuts, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds are high in protein along with essential fats, fiber and nutrients.

Canned vegetables are a great choice for emergency food storage. Green beans, wax beans, white kernel corn, beets, peas, zucchini, asparagus spears, sun dried tomatoes, mushrooms, tomatoes, peas & carrots, olives, dill pickles, eggplant, baby corn, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, roasted red peppers, pimentos and artichoke hearts are low-carb options. Buy what foods your family enjoy and will eat. Don’t spend money and stock up on food that no one will eat. Don’t pour off the water the vegetables are canned in. It can be used in place of drinking water in the food prep.

Look for fruit packed in water, check the label and buy the lowest carb variety you can find. Mandarin oranges are relatively carb friendly. Remember your children and stock up on canned fruit for them. Dried fruit and raisins are excellent kid choices. Dried or dehydrated fruit or fruit leather will keep well for long periods of time. Invest in low-carb crackers for the canned meats, nut butters and soup you’ll have on hand.

If you have small children or infants, don’t forget the baby food and formula and bottled baby juice. Buy canned formula that doesn’t require added water. Powdered baby food that you mix with water and only prepare the amount you need for one feeding is excellent if the power is off and refrigeration is a problem.

For adults, canned V-8 juice or tomato juice is relatively low-carb. Again, if you have children stock up on canned juice that is sugar free or very low in sugar content, or boxed juice. Unsweetened canned coconut milk is very low-carb. Stock powdered milk and sugar-free powdered juice mix but store extra water for items such as this. Canned evaporated milk can be used in cooking or for drinking.

Dry soup mixes will keep well for long periods. Canned broth is a good low-carb choice – look for low-sodium beef, chicken or vegetable. Add a few spoons of tomato juice for body and sip a cup of this before a meal. It will fill you up and you won’t need to eat as much. Canned cream soups often have low carb counts but be sure and read labels.

Dried eggs, bouillon cubes or granules, sugar-free instant cocoa, cider, instant coffee, instant tea, tea bags, sugar free hard candy, sugar free pudding packs, sugar free jell-o, salsa (will make dried eggs palatable) low-carb energy bars, low-carb candy and canned low-carb shakes are good food storage choices. Don’t forget the salt and pepper or the manual can opener! You need a way to open all of those cans!

You can store trail-mix for the kids and make your own low-carb versions that contain nuts, seeds and unsweetened coconut. If you have sugar-free jell-o mix on hand but no refrigerator, use half of the water called for in the directions and the jell-o will set up without refrigeration.

You should also have vitamins for every family member. Children do not store vitamins like an adult does, and the vitamin stores in their body can become depleted very quickly. Under stressful conditions, an adult body will deplete vitamin stores much more quickly than normal.

You need to plan on storing at least three days worth of food for each family member. The food you select should be non-perishable and require no refrigeration and very little water during food prep. Only prepare the amount of food you can eat during one meal. There may not be a heat source for cooking – cans of sterno work well for this but keep in mind that you should store food that can be eaten cold as well as hot.

The food you buy for storage should be kept in a cool, dark place away from temperature extremes. Buy large trash cans with tight fitting lids and keep your supplies safe from bugs, critters and rain water. Large storage containers, as long as they are waterproof, will serve you well.

Keep an eye on your food stores and don’t simply buy the food and forget about it. As you store the food, label it with the date and rotate the food in and out. If it has been stored for what seems like too long, add the stores to your pantry and replace with fresh supplies.

Write out your food storage plan and follow through with it. Make a list for each member of the family and buy and store what each person will need. When an emergency hits, you’ll be ready.

Don’t Wait For The Middle Finger

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Young ones (well, anyone younger than me, aka 50 and younger), please don’t be like me.

I treated my body like it was immortal: nothing I did or didn’t do would have a lasting effect. Despite the little things (which just kept building up) I felt when I turned 30 years old, I kept right on rolling, downing that Crunch Berry cereal while doing virtually no physical activity. The scale didn’t matter, how my body felt didn’t matter, all I cared about was what goody I was going to put in my mouth next to drown out my emotions. I told myself I didn’t care what anyone else thought and I didn’t. The problem was, I just didn’t care, period.

I only looked in the mirror with “tunnel vision”, seeing only my face to put on tons of makeup (to cover up my blotchy skin and apply contour to my double chin) and fix my highly damaged hair but never looking at my body. I cannot remember ever looking at my body just out of the shower.

The year I turned 42 years old, after YEARS of warning signs, was the year my body stuck up its middle finger at me and said, “I’m done”. Thankfully, I have never had high blood pressure or high cholesterol but I became allergic to just about everything, I got sick if anyone looked at me funny, and I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Through diet and exercise over the past 8 years, I have reduced my A1C from 9.0 to 5.7 (my first ever fasting blood sugar was 400). I am very proud to officially no longer have type 2 diabetes and did it on my own.

Unfortunately, there is only so much proper (for me) diet and exercise can do after 42 years of neglect and abuse. Here is a partial list of the issues I am dealing with:

  • Allergy shots for the next 5 years
  • Gallbladder removal 7 months ago
  • Severe intestinal issues that were not resolved by removing the gallbladder. I am still undergoing testing to figure out what is causing this (upper endoscopy, MRI, so much blood work the technician knows me by name). Next will probably be scheduled for a colonoscopy (if none of the current tests reveal anything).
  • Just had a TIA (mini-stroke) in my eye last week. There was no permanent damage but this means more tests (went to the lab two days in a row this week and have 2 MRI scans next week), more doctors (in addition to my allergist, dermatologist, ophthalmologist, primary care, and gastroenterologist, I have an appointment with a neurologist and am waiting for a referral to a cardiologist) AND I had to stop exercising because that TIA could possibly lead to a full-blown stroke (can you say stress?).

To be brutally honest, I have no idea how much of what is still wrong with me could have been avoided if I had cared about myself earlier in life but now, I will never know. All I can do is hang on, say a few prayers, and do whatever I can to get through this so I can (once again) start over on my fitness journey. As soon as I am given some sort of clearance, I am hitting the weights and my neglected exercise bike (there will also be some digging in the yard going on, too, since I was not able to finish planting before this all happened).

So, you young whipper snappers, please. Take a good, hard look at your lifestyle. Take into account that you will not be in your 20’s forever. Our bodies age, whether we want them to or not. How old do you want to feel when you are 30, 40, or 50? Do you want to be able to do whatever you enjoy or would you prefer to get out of breath walking to the mail box? Do what is best (not easiest) for your health now so you do not end up like me.

My View About Atkins Products

I know I have been highly critical about Atkins Nutritionals over the years (especially once I realized what Dr. Atkins original vision was). Dr. Atkins stressed whole, real food and for them to push meal replacement bars and shakes really irritates me. That being said, I have eaten and enjoyed their bars in the past and, if you feel the need, you should too!

Those bars kept me sane. They kept me on track. Those Atkins bars gave me something I was happy eating, when what I really wanted was a giant Snickers. I began with the free bars they sent to me. Then, I bought them by the box. I would eat one a day (more or less). After a while (maybe a couple of months), one box would last me well over a month. That is when I stopped buying them. I just didn’t want them any more. This, as a lifeline in the beginning of any weight-loss journey, is where I think any of Atkins’ ready-to-eat items should be: a temporary solution until cravings have subsided. I have never (and probably never will) tried their shakes or other snacks/meal replacement bars.

There are a lot of other, less expensive (and higher quality) options out there. Just take a look wherever they sell protein bars. Read the labels (especially total carbohydrates). Look at the ingredients. I know a lot of people who have never looked in that aisle of the store who are shocked by the variety that is out there. Just think about all those people around the globe who have been in the fitness/body building industry for decades! They have researched and come up with items that are typically high in protein, while being low in fat and carbohydrates (that doesn’t taste like you are chewing on a vitamin).

Just today, I experienced my 4th low blood sugar day since having to switch around my diet. So, while at the drug store, I grabbed a Powerbar Protein Plus bar (chocolate peanut butter). It has 25 grams of total carbs and 4 grams fiber (perfect since I have to limit my fiber). Comparing this with Atkins version, which has 23 grams of total carbohydrates and 14 grams of fiber, the Powerbar is much bigger and more filling. It evened out my blood sugar until I could finish shopping and, if I recall correctly, tastes about the same as the Atkins version but didn’t leave me still wanting more. I also checked out my Costco’s selection of protein bars and the Kirkland brand bars are reasonable on carbohydrates (17 and 16 total grams).

 

As for shakes, if you choose to use them, take a look at the various protein powders that are available (that are not Atkins branded). I am finishing up a container of MusclePharm Cookies and Cream protein powder now and just bought ON Gold Standard Chocolate (both from Costco). They are protein powders … these will not cause massive digestive side effects like most “diet” ones do and taste great while still being lower in sugars. I just paid $40 for 50 servings! Try buying any of the diet shakes (like Atkins or Slimfast) at that price! My Costco only carries one flavor but go to this link and check out the other flavors they offer. I wish Costco carried Banana Cream or Strawberry!

Atkins’ frozen meals were highly disappointing. The price was too high for such a small amount of food that was just edible. If you are willing to read labels, you need to look at the other options that are in the freezer aisle. Not everything is breaded or covered with gravy anymore.

The points I am making are:

  1. Just because a product is labeled “Atkins” does not make it either good or unique. Look around and you will be astounded by the options that are out there;
  2. Do not listen to those who may belittle a product simply because the ingredients are not whole foods, 100% natural, organic, paleo, sourced from the jungles of the Amazon by angels riding on the backs of unicorns. You do whatever you need to do to keep yourself sane and on track to become as healthy as possible!

One Week of Whining (and South Beach Ginger Chicken)

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Over the course of the last week, I have been such a whiner! I have been desperately searching for ideas about how to reduce my fat intake without having to buy a ton of new food. So, I have begun diligently tracking my foods again on My Fitness Pal. I then remembered bodybuilders typically eat lower fat, so I am eating a modified “bro” diet but with flavor (lowering my fats, raising my non-meat proteins while keeping my fiber really low). The idea of plain baked chicken breast or fish made me cry BUT I just discovered that Costco sells egg whites!

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One of the books I have been holding onto (my sister is a pathological book buyer and gives me some when she purges her inventory) is the South Beach diet. I never got a chance to even open it before last week but I am glad I did! This recipe is amazing! This would be wonderful with just any meat (I have been fantasizing about this with shrimp)!

South Beach Ginger and Garlic Chicken Breasts

I doubled the recipe, poured everything into a baking dish, and baked it at 350 degrees F for about 30 minutes. The chicken was so moist and tender! If you need more fat, you can add a little bit of olive oil to the basic marinade before cooking. The resulting juices were fantastic as a sauce!

I have also bought a few new things to help me get into shape while we try to figure out what is going on with my gut:

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This recumbent exercise bike is amazing! After the first use, I did have to put a cushion on the seat due to my bum falling asleep but I have used it every day since I got it without irritating my stomach. It’s a Marcy ME 709.

 

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AND a new scale that has the geek in me squealing with delight!

So, this screen shot is the closest thing to porn you will get from me! Take note that I am currently 49 years old but the results show that metabolically I am 53. I am doing what I can right now to change that but will do so much more once we figure out what the heck is wrong with me!

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That’s it for this update! Please, try that South Beach chicken recipe! You will not regret it! Have a great week!

“Spam” and Eggs … Help!

Well, it looks like my gallbladder was just one part of my health issue. Since having it removed in October, I started feeling a little better, then slowly went downhill. All my organs look good (especially the surgical area), so last week I had my first audition for a porn movie (Upper Endoscopy). There wasn’t anything dire but they did see several inflamed areas. I am currently waiting for the biopsy results (they took several) and waiting for my insurance to approve a scan to make sure there aren’t any rogue gallstones floating around anywhere.

In the mean time, I have been instructed to change my eating to low fat, little to no fiber, nothing hot/spicy (especially black pepper) and no large solid chunks of meat that will be more difficult to digest. EVERYTHING in my house is high fat! Last week, I was whining and crying because I have no idea how to even cook low fat (and no solid meat)!

So, now that I have calmed down, I wanted to show you my way of getting at least some meat in my belly for breakfast:

This is 2 eggs, half a cup of baked on a rack so it is lower fat DRY ham, and just a bit of half and half blended and cooked in a non-stick skillet sprayed with PAM. It’s actually tasty and surprisingly filling but I need help!

Does anyone have any ideas/recipes that I might be able to tweak that aren’t all scrambled eggs? I could boil meats to remove more fat but then what? My intestines HAVE been happier/less fetal-position painful but I need ideas! All I have in my house is meat and full-fat everything else. Please help me!

Oven Roasted Tri-tip

One dark and stormy night (a relief in Central California) we really didn’t want to barbecue in the rain (and we were low on charcoal). So, my husband made a tri tip roast in the oven. If you aren’t accustomed to this cut, here’s the Wiki about it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tri-tip.

How we (my husband as I watched and took pictures) made it:

Oven Roasted Tri-tip Roast

Ingredients:

  • 1 beef tri tip roast
  • Your choice of seasonings

Season your roast (we have been using McCormick Montreal Steak seasoning lately).

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.

Place a heavy skillet (we love our cast iron) on the stove and heat on high. Once the skillet is hot, add about a teaspoon of oil to the pan (or spray with Pam). Place the roast in the pan and sear it for about 4 minutes (as you can see from the photos, it wasn’t that brown this time and turned out better than ever). Flip it over and sear the other side.

Now, place the skillet in the oven (do not cover) and let cook until you are happy with the doneness. Here’s a great webpage about proper doneness of beef: https://www.certifiedangusbeef.com/kitchen/doneness.php. The basic rule of thumb is 10 minutes per pound. We baked ours for almost 20 minutes and removed the tri tip from the oven when the thermometer read 135 degree F. While resting (we let it rest for 10 minutes before cutting) it reached 140 degrees F.

That’s it! To serve, either slice it thick (against the grain) like a steak or thin (think roast beef). My favorite way to eat it is with some cheese and avocado (OH! Maybe some horseradish sauce, too!). Tri tip is great leftover, too! Either dice it and add to scrambled eggs, pan-fry and serve with fried eggs, or just grab a piece and munch away!

Here’s some pictures (unless you do not like this setup, I think I will post any recipes I/we create before any pictures because I HATE having to scroll a mile just to read a recipe).

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Browning in cast iron skillet

 

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Our meat thermometer from Home Depot
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Resting
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Medium Rare (almost medium) 140 degree internal temperature

Keto, Atkins, and now Carnivore? Sigh.

Watch out for health buzzwords.

I really hate fads. Atkins was the first. Then Caveman (which morphed into Paleo). Keto is just starting to be a bit more recognized but now I am beginning to see the Carnivore diet. Now that I am sitting here, writing and researching my own book (basically, a simplified companion book to the original “Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution”), I keep running into all these faddish buzzwords that cause me to jerk my fingers from the keyboard before I make a total ass of myself.

I have never (and will never) go on a fat fast (eating nothing but fat) or an egg fast (eating nothing but eggs) or a soup fast (diet? I have no idea what the buzzword associated with this one is) simply to lose weight. If this is what I need to do to lose weight, I might as well buy some Dexatrim and live off of Slimfast shakes (that way, all my hair can fall out like my mom’s did when that is what she resorted to for quick weight-loss).

Fad diets have been around for quite a while (I used to have a women’s style book from the 1920’s that included a “Hollywood Diet” that somehow left out the illicit drugs they were doing in Hollywood at the time). When I first hear about Dr. Atkins’ “Eat Nothing But Bacon And Lose Weight” diet, I viewed it as just another fad. This is why I refused to read any of Dr. Atkins’ books (until I had to).

Now that I have read the books, I am glad I was wrong. What Dr. Atkins did was brought the clinical ketogenic diet (which was designed in 1923 for treating epileptic patients) into the mainstream by eliminating most of the counting (he focused solely on carbohydrates) and, since most of the public would balk at remaining on such a low carbohydrate diet, revealed a pathway back to a somewhat “normal” way of eating.

If you do not know what a clinical ketogenic diet looks like, check out this page: https://charliefoundation.org/diet-plans/ (which has 5 variations of a ketogenic diet) or watch this short video from Charlie Foundation:

And now, there is Carnivore. What is it? Meat, eggs, butter, and cheese. Doesn’t this sound similar to the clinical ketogenic diet? All they did was remove virtually all carbohydrates (I say virtually because the softer the cheese, the more milk sugars, thus carbohydrates, it has).

It’s almost all branding (or re-branding) to sell books, lectures, courses, or products. So, which of these is the best? That is up to you. If you want to limit your food variety and never count, look into the Carnivore diet. If you don’t mind counting a little, then the original Atkins is for you. If you like to micromanage every bit of food you consume, then Keto is the way to go! Just please, do not go on the Cabbage soup diet!

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